0800 0148 321
to book a free local assessment

Blepharoplasty surgery on its own, or in combination with the other procedures listed below, will boost your confidence and self-esteem by refreshing your tired looking eyes.

Phakic Intraoclular Lens Implant (IOL)

Phakic intraocular lenses (IOL) or phakic lenses are new devices used to correct refractive errors, most commonly, near-sightedness. These thin lenses made of plastic or silicone, are implanted permanently into the eye to help reduce the need for glasses or contact lenses.

Phakic intraocular lenses (IOL) or phakic lenses are new devices used to correct refractive errors, most commonly, near-sightedness. These thin lenses made of plastic or silicone, are implanted permanently into the eye to help reduce the need for glasses or contact lenses.

The cornea and natural lens of the eye focus light to create an image on the retina, much like the way the lens of a camera focuses light to create an image on film. The bending and focusing of light is also known as refraction. Imperfections in the focusing power of the eye, called refractive errors, cause images on the retina to be out of focus or blurred.

People that are near-sighted have more difficulty seeing distant objects than near objects. For these people, the images of distant objects come to focus in front of the retina instead of on the retina. Ideally, phakic lenses cause light entering the eye to be focused on the retina providing clear distance vision without the aid of glasses or contact lenses. Phakic refers to the fact that the lens is implanted into the eye without removing the eye's natural lens.

Your surgeon may consider phakic lenses if you are not suitable for other types of laser vision correction due to very thin cornea or very high refractive errors. Some patients may benefit from a combination of Laser correction and a phakic lens. Refractive surgery is not recommended to those who have refractive instability. Ideally, you should be over 18 years old and have had stable vision and optical prescription for at least the last two years.



Some jobs prohibit certain refractive procedures. Be sure to check with your employer/professional society/military service before undergoing any procedure.

The suitability for treatment using phakic lenses can only be determined at a consultation with a trained refractive surgeon.

Risks of surgery
All surgery carries some uncertainty and risk 
When eye surgery is performed by a qualified refractive surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. In some cases, patients develop glare, halos, double vision, and/or decreased vision in situations of low-level lighting that can cause difficulty with performing tasks, such as driving, particularly at night or under foggy conditions.

Phakic lenses are a relatively new technology. Therefore, there may be other risks to having phakic lenses implanted that have not yet been discovered. Your surgeon will provide detailed information about the risks and benefits during your consultation

Preparing for surgery
Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. If you wear contact lenses, your doctor may ask you to stop wearing them before your initial examination, so that your refraction (measure of how much your eye bends light) and central keratometry readings (measure of how much the cornea curves) are more accurate.

Types of anaesthesia
For most patients, the surgery is done under local anaesthesia using drops instilled on the surface of the eye. This means you'll be awake during the surgery, but insensitive to any discomfort.

The surgery
During phakic lens implantation surgery, a small incision is made in the cornea at the front of the eye. The phakic lens is inserted through the incision and placed just in front of or just behind the iris. Depending upon the type of phakic lens, the surgeon will either attach the lens to the front of the iris in the anterior chamber of the eye or move it through the pupil into position behind the iris and in front of the lens in the posterior chamber of the eye. The incision will then be closed with sutures. The surgery will probably take around 30 minutes.

After surgery
After the surgical procedure, you may be sensitive to light and have a feeling that something is in your eye. You may experience minor discomfort after the procedure. You will be prescribed eye drops for after the surgery. You will need to take these drops for up to a few weeks after surgery to decrease inflammation and help prevent infection. You will also be provided with a shield to cover your eye.

Getting back to normal
It usually takes about 2 to 4 weeks for the vision to stabilise and it will take about 8 weeks for your eye to heal.